How To Safely Hike in the Dark

Autumn is upon us and the days are getting shorter. You know what that means. Hot cocoa, marshmallows, and hot cocoa with marshmallows.

What better place to enjoy your hot cocoa than in the brisk darkness of the wilderness?

Damn right! But when night creeps up on you sooner than expected, you'll be wise to take precautions to ensure you make it home safe.

About this time a few years ago, in Glacier NP, I miscalculated how long it would take me to get back to camp. As a consequence, I found myself staring down a hungry bear in the darkness of the forest. I was just yards away from the false safety of my tent when I heard a rustling sound in the bushes. I turned and before I knew it, was face-to-face with a grizzly three times my size, with only 5 or 6 feet separating us.

Eyes glowing yellow in the moonlight, it turned toward me, but remained where it was, sizing me up. This was the most intense staring contest I’d ever been in. Seconds felt like minutes. Hand on my bear spray, I remained as still as I could, wondering if the bear could hear my beating heart.

All of the skills I learned over the years were rushing through my mind, as I plotted my possible escape. At the same time, I was slowly resigning and thinking, “there are worse ways to die.” All of this probably happened in a matter of seconds, but it felt like hours.

Then, like a cacophony of knights, a pack of coyotes started wailing off in the distance. My adversary seemed to take this as a sign of distraction, and just trotted off like it was nothing.

I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t a little offended. What, I’m not delicious enough for you? A pack of howling coyotes miles away is enough for you to just scoff at my savory offering?

Pfff, whatever, bear. Whatever.

 

Hiking and backpacking at night don’t have to be scary or treacherous. The darkness of the nighttime provides an unmatched serenity you can enjoy. Getting past the fear of the unknown is itself a courageous reward. It also makes room for an added layer of exploration with heightened senses. Sort of like being (partially) blindfolded. You’re relying on all your senses and will pick up on things you wouldn’t usually notice.

Same world. Different world.

Desert in Moonlight -  Thomas Shellberg

Desert in Moonlight - Thomas Shellberg

Trekking in the moonlight is cool because the it casts interesting shadows, offering a unique perspective on your surroundings. If the moon is bright enough you may not need a headlamp, allowing you to see the night landscape with a broader view. 

If you’re lucky enough to be far from any city lights, the stars will blow your mind. If you're really lucky, you'll be able to see the Milky Way shining bright like an astronomical angel in the sky. 

Sounds great, right?

It is. 

It’s even better if you’re not constantly worrying about whether you’re going to make it out alive. So here are some basic tips to make sure your amazing night trek is the best experience you can have:

Headlamp by Night - ©️  Teddy Kelley

Headlamp by Night - ©️ Teddy Kelley

Bring a headlamp, or flashlight (or both). And bring extra batteries (and know how to change them, in case you have to do so in the dark). Being able to see is pretty fundamental to night hiking.

Bring some type of navigation. GPS, map & compass, etc. Knowing how to get around is important. Even more so at night when you have fewer landmarks and clever tools at your disposal.

Start slow and familiar. Short hikes first, close to home. Make sure you like it (you will), then go hog wild thousands of miles away.

Bringing a hiking partner isn't a bad idea. Someone to calm you when you see strange things (like a tree stump suddenly resembling a forest creature). It's also someone to share their hot cocoa and marshmallows with you.

Bring extra clothing, food, and water. When it gets dark, it gets cold. Fast. Waterproof clothing is useful for dew or rain. You’ll probably get hungry (as most people do when they’re trekking), so food is a necessity.

And water… duh. Let the other person carry the cocoa.

Bonus: Grab a camera. You can get some badass pictures at night. Star trails, the Milky Way, moonlight pictures, long-exposure shots of landmarks. Taking pictures of familiar landscapes at night allows you to see them in a new and fun way.

Milky Way - ©️  Jakub Gorajek

Milky Way - ©️ Jakub Gorajek

 

So go! Frolic in the glowing moonlight (safely). And if you see that bear, tell him I'm so totally over it.

 

What’s your favorite night trekking experience? Tell us in the comments.

 

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Life in Death Valley: The Super Bloom

Cracked Desert Earth - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Cracked Desert Earth - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Anyone who has been to Death Valley in Eastern California knows it can be a harsh, fearful environment.

I grew up in the comfortable climate of the Pacific Northwest, where the temps seldom rise above the mid-80s. The first time I came to Death Valley it was an instant shock to my delicate system. I stepped out of my car into the blistering 126-degree heat and nearly choked on my own stifled breath.

The second time I visited the park, I was actually blown over by a gust of wind, right onto my ass. Granted, I weigh in at just over a Benjamin (100lbs). But that’s 85% Grade-A lean meat of Benji. I'd expect a little more stability from all the time I put into my training.

As you can imagine, I fell in love with this place with a quickness. Every girl loves a bad boy who can choke her and knock her down, but still astounds her with awe and makes her cry tears of joy. Am I right?

Look, it’s a complicated relationship.

Dante's View at Sunrise in Death Valley - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Dante's View at Sunrise in Death Valley - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Mesquite Flats Sand Dunes at Sunset - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Mesquite Flats Sand Dunes at Sunset - ©️ Nicole Atkins

My point is this place doesn’t mess around when it comes to weather. I'm sure the variety of climate conditions contribute to the spectacular sunrise and sunsets you’ll see in the area.

Death Valley is a strange and beautiful place. The lowest point in the park is 282 feet below sea level, and the highest point rises to over 11,000 feet.

You can imagine there are a variety of landscapes you might not expect from a desert environment. That’s what you get for making assumptions. Shame on you.

One special surprise the park gifts us is the colorful display of wildflowers that spring up each year between the months of February and June.

The splash of color against the muted backdrop of sand create an appealing contrast usually reserved for oil paintings.

Desert Gold Close-Up - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Desert Gold Close-Up - ©️ Nicole Atkins

 

Once in a rare while, when the conditions are just right, the park will experience a Super Bloom. The last two Super Blooms were in 1998 and 2005, so the park hasn’t seen an event like this in over a decade. El Nino brought heavy rain to the area this year, making the once harsh environment fertile for another Super Bloom. We all waited in anxious anticipation to see what would happen, and the Desert of Doom did not disappoint.

Washes usually spotted with Desert Gold wildflowers are now blanketed in sheets of yellow. Just looking at it makes you want to roll around like a feline stoned on catnip.

Desert Gold Super Bloom at Sunrise - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Desert Gold Super Bloom at Sunrise - ©️ Nicole Atkins

You can actually frolic in the flowers like a happy child, waving your arms about, singing tunes from The Sound of Music. You can do this in the hottest place on earth (and driest in North America). Talk about a rare and splendid opportunity.

And let’s be honest. When you’re in a field of wildflowers the only appropriate action is to frolic gaily.

Desert Gold Super Bloom - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Desert Gold Super Bloom - ©️ Nicole Atkins

The Super Bloom won’t last long. Most of the flowers will be gone by late June or July. While they’re here, the surplus of vibrant blossoms is awaiting your deserved admiration. So go, see history in the making. Walk through the Valley of Death and see for yourself there’s no evil to fear. It’s a veritable gangsters paradise right now. Ah yes, that’s where I’ve heard that line. ;-)

Check out some of the great hikes while you’re there. Death Valley boasts some fantastic canyons and sand dunes. There's even a massive volcanic crater.

Mesquite Flats Sand Dunes in Death Valley - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Mesquite Flats Sand Dunes in Death Valley - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Zabriskie Point in Death Valley - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Zabriskie Point in Death Valley - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Mosaic Canyon in Death Valley - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Mosaic Canyon in Death Valley - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Ubehebe Crater in Death Valley - ©️ Nicole Atkins

Ubehebe Crater in Death Valley - ©️ Nicole Atkins

 

Have you been to Death Valley, or been fortunate enough to witness a Super Bloom? Tell us about it!

 

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